Cans Across Conference

By Scotty McGuire

For the past several years, all of the institutions in USA South have participated in Cans Across Conference. The event was started up by the USA South Athletic Conference Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) back in 2004. Each SAAC committee on campus has to come up with certain ways to collect cans. The school collects as many cans as possible in an effort to raise awareness and food for the charity of their choice. Some schools have gotten very creative in raising cans.

Greensboro College has been successful in past Cans Across Conferences. Since the event began, we have placed first in 2005 and 2007, collecting a total of 3,863 cans in ’05 and 4,740 in ‘07. Greensboro placed second in 2009 and 2006. The charity they chose to donate to was the Greensboro Urban Ministry. This group provides crisis intervention and emergency services to those in need. Their website states, “Our mission is to express the love of God to people in need through practical action in the Greater Greensboro area.” Last year our own Greensboro College held a makeshift Super Bowl calling it “Soup Bowl”. Students and fans would bring cans to the Soup Bowl in support for not only their school, but also for a great cause.

This year, individual teams on campus are collecting cans and the team with the most cans wins a prize at the end of the competition. If anyone wants to donate and support the Greensboro Urban Ministry, you can give your cans to your favorite team to help them win. Greensboro College needs your help to become the 2017 Cans Across Campus champions so go out and donate those cans people! Go Pride!

Cathryn Bennett: Citizen of the World

By Timothy Crowell.
Ms. Cathryn Bennett, Director of International Programs at Greensboro College. Photo courtesy of Lex Alexander.

On Sept. 22, Ms. Cathyrn Bennett, the Director of International Programs at Greensboro College, presented the first Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation Colloquium of the 2017-18 school year to the students, faculty and staff of Greensboro College and others from the Greensboro community. This presentation, titled “Peaks and Valleys: Learning and Unlearning Culture,” marked the first Colloquium in the series’ new venue, the Campbell Lyceum, located on the first floor of Proctor Hall West.

International students Alla Alaghbri, Vheenah Dei-Tumi, Lena Faber and Paulina Frank welcomed the audience in their native languages and Dr. Natasha W. Veale, Associate Professor of Special Education at Greensboro College, introduced Ms. Bennett and moderated the question and answer session at the end of the lecture. Paulina Frank also won the Amazon gift card at the giveaway following the lecture, which is a tradition at the Tannenbaum-Sternberger Colloquium Series.

Bennett, who was born in Germany and raised in the United States, intertwined personal anecdotes from her travels with broad issues concerning cultural and social issues facing the world today. After claiming there are 164 ways to define culture, Bennett said that she wanted to “convey the complexity of identity,” which is an issue she faced as she lived among different cultures in her travels. In her lecture, she wanted to “encourage genuine discussion,” especially among students, and stress the fact that “context is everything” when discussing cultural attitudes and customs.

At one point in the presentation, Bennett said, “I have the best job,” since she works with people from many different cultures around the world. She then shared stories from her teaching and other work experiences, which led to her main point on the importance of learning and unlearning culture and when it is necessary to do each. She summarized by saying “it’s possible to create a new culture” by knowing what traditions and methods are still helpful to a culture and by combining these with new ideas and experiences.

As the presentation ended, Bennett encouraged more discussion between people of different cultures and between students and educators. Despite her many traveling experiences, Bennett says she is still learning about cultural practices like politeness and other societal expressions, and she encouraged the audience to continue to ask questions as well. Because of her worldly experiences as an educator, Bennett posed the question, directed at the other educators, “Who does the teaching, and who does the learning?”

German Student Engages in Study Abroad Opportunity at Greensboro College

By Keeley Catarineau
Paulina Frank. Courtesy of Paulina Frank.

Paulina Frank, a foreign exchange student from Germany, is attending Greensboro College this fall semester. Frank usually lives near Stuttgart, which is a city in the southern part of Germany, and studies at the University of Education in Ludwigsburg, but this fall she is living and learning at Greensboro College.

“Back home, I live in quite a small village, so it is very different to live in a city,” Frank said. “I am not used to driving everywhere. Back home, we usually don’t drive to places within the village, but walk or go by bike.”

Even though Greensboro, N.C., varies so much from Frank’s home, she has grown fond of the city and of Greensboro College.

“I really like Greensboro, the campus and city are beautiful and everybody is so friendly and welcoming,” Frank said. “Greensboro College actually wasn’t my first choice, but I am glad that I got to go here because I like the small campus and classes.”

Along with the significant differences between Frank’s home in Germany and Greensboro College, such as language, there are also small differences that stand out.

“People randomly ask you how you are doing here on the street, even though you don’t know who they are and have never seen them before,” Frank said. “In Germany, you mostly just smile at someone, but usually you don’t greet strangers at all.”

While it may be strange for Frank to have to adjust to all these new experiences, Georgieann Bogdan, a study-abroad advisor at Greensboro College, believes it will stand to benefit her in the long run.

“I believe to be an educated citizen today requires students to be able to see the world through others’ eyes,” said Bogdan. “In order to understand the world issues we confront we must look outside of our own culture. The skills needed to be an informed citizen are enhanced by an education abroad experience.”

If any Greensboro College students are interested in studying abroad in the future, they should contact Bogdan for more information. She can be reached by email at georgieann.bogdan@greensboro.edu. Cathryn Bennett, Director of International Programs at Greensboro College, can also be reached for more information on study-abroad programs at cathryn.bennett@greensboro.edu.

We Carried Kevan, Now Can We Carry Others?

By Emily Lewis
Luke Thompson, Kevan Chandler and Philip Keller, (left to right) answer questions after
the viewing. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hines

On September 17, Chandler and two of the friends who carried him – including Greensboro College alumni Philip Keller – visited Greensboro College to host a screening and discussion of the documentary that came out of his journey. The movie, titled “We Carry Kevan,” focuses on Chandler and his friends’ experiences as they traveled through Europe.

During the discussion that followed the film, Chandler was asked many times about his various views on disability issues and advocacy. In one of his final statements, Chandler was asked about what he wanted others to “get” from the movie and Chandler summarized his view.

“Yes, I am disabled. People know that and I know that. There is no reason to try and pretend like it isn’t true, but that shouldn’t be the end of me … I am a lot of other things, and I hope our trip shows people that and gives other disabled people the chance to see the world as I did.”

Chandler, in addition to releasing his documentary about the trip, just recently released a book about the experience and began a nonprofit. Chandler hopes to use his nonprofit to explore new and innovative methods and products that can help to enable individuals with physical disabilities. He has already begun working with a German company to design a backpack based on the one that he used during his travels that will be specifically designed for carrying disabled individuals.

image2

The original backpack Kevan Chandler was
carried in. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hines

Fun and Fitness at Reynolds Center

by Jahleen LeBeau

Every year the Greensboro College Royce Reynolds Family Student Life Center extends a warm welcome with their offering of a number of fun events and fitness classes for the community. These classes and events are open for any Greensboro College student or faculty member, or anyone with a Reynolds Center membership. The Reynold Center hours can be found on the Greensboro College official website by clicking the “Life on Campus” tab and scrolling down to “Reynolds Center.” The Reynolds Center hours include Monday through Friday 8 a.m.- 9 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m.
This year, the Reynolds Center is offering yoga classes on Mondays at 5:30 p.m., HIIT (high intensity interval training) classes on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m., Yoga Flow classes on Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. and fun Bootcamp classes on Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. All classes are held at the Reynolds Center in the aerobics room. You can even bring a friend or family member as a guest to join in on these classes for a small fee of $5 a day.
“These classes are a good opportunity for students who don’t feel comfortable in the weight room to still get in a good workout,” said Adam Medina, a sophomore at Greensboro College who goes to the Reynolds Center for workouts daily.
Alongside these wonderful fitness classes, the Reynolds Center also offers a number of events open for students and faculty members such as several intramural sport games, bingo night, performances from several artists, motivational speeches and more. Each month the Reynolds Center aims to feature two entertaining events. The upcoming events for September include Chef Egg on September 27. This is going to be the ultimate “cooking eggsperience.” After September we can look forward to all of the homecoming events the first week in October. The details on the homecoming events are to be announced soon. Be sure to keep an eye on your student emails to keep up with all

Neewollah is Back!

By Email Lewis

For those new to campus, Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) might sound like a weird term. However, for the children at the Boys and Girls club and elsewhere in the community, it is something they look forward to every year. This is an alternative trick-or-treating activity held on the Greensboro College campus each year. Students can register their dorm room as available for the kids to visit while trick-or-treating. The sign-up sheet will be provided ahead of time in the dorms such as Greensboro Hall and Hill Hall. The candy is even offered for free for the students to hand out. In addition to this, there is also a carnival that the kids can attend on back campus. The carnival is made up of stations where the kids can win treats and prizes.

The activity is in relation to Greensboro College’s own Village 401 run by Robert Brewer on campus. The program encourages as many people as possible to participate. The more people, the longer and more fun the event can be. The program also needs volunteers for the carnival to help run the stations. It only lasts an hour or two, so any time that people can help is appreciated. There is no official date or time that is set yet. This is a safe and fun way for the college to help out and contribute to the community, and a fun annual outlet for the kids.

Why does Village 401 do this? Jennifer Allen who works with the club says, “I enjoy seeing kids having fun while being safe.”

For some children it may be their only chance to go trick-or-treating, so come help out and make it a good day for the kids.

If you are interested in helping, contact Jenn Allen (jennifer.allen@greensboro.edu) or Kathryn Stevens (kathryn.stevens@greensboro.edu) for more information about Neewollah and Village 401. Give the kids something to remember this upcoming Halloween!

Cathryn Bennett: Citizen of the World

Ms. Cathryn Bennett, Director of International Programs at Greensboro College
Picture courtesy of: Lex Alexander
By Timothy Crowell

On Friday, Sept. 22, Ms. Cathyrn Bennett, the Director of International Programs at Greensboro College, presented the first Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation Colloquium of the 2017-18 school year to the students, faculty and staff of Greensboro College and others from the Greensboro community. This presentation, titled “Peaks and Valleys: Learning and Unlearning Culture,” marked the first Colloquium in the series’s new venue, the Campbell Lyceum, located on the first floor of Proctor Hall West. Bennett is also the faculty advisor for the Social Justice Club and a visiting faculty member for the International Institute for Education Development, which partners with Teachers Without Borders. She is involved with the International Advisory Committee in Greensboro as well.

International students Alla Alaghbri, Vheenah Dei-Tumi, Lena Faber and Paulina Frank welcomed the audience in their native languages, and Dr. Natasha W. Veale, Associate Professor of Special Education at Greensboro College, introduced Ms. Bennett and moderated the question and answer session at the end of the lecture. Paulina Frank also won the Amazon gift card at the giveaway following the lecture, which is a tradition at the Tannenbaum-Sternberger Colloquium Series.

Bennett, who was born in Germany and raised in the United States, intertwined personal anecdotes from her travels with broad issues concerning cultural and social issues facing the world today. After claiming there are 164 ways to define culture, Bennett said that she wanted to “convey the complexity of identity,” which is an issue she faced as she lived among different cultures in her travels. In her lecture, she wanted to “encourage genuine discussion,” especially among students, and stress the fact that “context is everything” when discussing cultural attitudes and customs.

At one point in the presentation, Bennett said, “I have the best job,” since she works with people from many different cultures around the world. She then shared stories from her teaching and other work experiences, which led to her main point on the importance of learning and unlearning culture and when it is necessary to do each. She summarized by saying “it’s possible to create a new culture” by knowing what traditions and methods are still helpful to a culture and by combining these with new ideas and experiences.

As the presentation ended, Bennett encouraged more discussion between people of different cultures and between students and educators. Despite her many traveling experiences, Bennett says she is still learning about cultural practices like politeness and other societal expressions, and she encouraged the audience to continue to ask questions as well. Because of her worldly experiences as an educator, Bennett posed the question, directed at the other educators, “Who does the teaching, and who does the learning?”

A New Addition to The Pride Family

By Griffen Riley
Lauren Brewer. Photo courtesy of Greensboro.edu.

This previous summer, Greensboro College hired Lauren Brewer as the new reference and instruction librarian. I met with her to find out a little more about our new addition to the Pride family.
Brewer was born and raised in Winston- Salem, attending Robert B. Glenn High School in Kernersville. She previously worked at Rowan Cabbarus Community College in Salisbury for a little over a year.
She received her bachelors in Women and Gender Studies from UNCG before going on to get her masters in Library and Information Studies from UNCG as well.
Brewer first decided to become a librarian after spending some time working at the library while in college.
“I was working in a library at the time and once I found out more information about the field from a professor, I decided it was something I wanted to pursue as a career.”
In her free time she loves to hike the local trails in Greensboro and Durham. She also loves to read true crime novels.
She loves being a librarian and had this to recommend to anyone thinking about becoming a librarian, “My advice to someone interested in being a librarian is to just talk to your librarians and be helpful. The library field is really competitive so experience is a huge factor. You don’t need a specific bachelor’s degree to pursue a master’s degree in library and information studies so a ton of schools offer it. I would encourage anyone interested in the field to come see me in the library.”
The James Addison Jones Library is open 85.5 hours per week during the academic year with extended hours during final exam periods. If you are interested in becoming a librarian or would like more information on how to get involved, email Brewer at lauren.brewer@greensboro.edu.

NC House Majority Whip Jon Hardister

By Tyler Fuller
Jon Hardister. Photo courtesy of JonHardister.com.

Jon Hardister is a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives. His district includes coverage of a large portion of Guilford County and parts of Greensboro. He was born and raised in Greensboro and was a 2006 graduate of Greensboro College with a bachelor’s degree in political science. We at The Collegian were fortunate enough to speak with Hardister on his experience at GC and his post-graduation career in politics.

Hardister chose GC over the plethora of colleges in the area because of “the friendly staff, historical campus and small class sizes,” also mentioning that the campus “felt like home from the start.” He describes his most cherished moments from college as being the debates in his political science classes, as they were “thoughtful and productive” and inevitably proved invaluable in his career as a state politician.

Hardister recalls initially becoming interested in pursuing politics during his senior year of high school after he turned 18 just in time to vote in the 2000 election. The voting process led to him wanting to become a more informed voter, and thus spurred a deeper interest in politics and government.

As a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives, Hardister places community involvement at the forefront of his focus, indicating that staying active in the community will ultimately lead to a more communicative and productive relationship between the legislator and the constituents. He currently holds the position of N.C. House Majority Whip, one of the top legislative positions in the state.

Hardister encourages anyone interested in pursuing a career in politics to engage themselves in the political process as early and as often as possible. He recommends seeking out internships with political offices just as he did, citing his internship at the office of then-Congressman Howard Coble as a “great experience” that “helped to prepare me for a career in politics.”

To the student body as a whole, Mr. Hardister encourages all “students to stay focused on their studies, have fun and look toward the future with a positive attitude. You can achieve your goals if you work hard and believe in yourself.”

Professor Brittany Søndberg’s Negative Measure

By Laine Walston
One of  Professor Søndberg’s works. Photo courtesy of Jim Langer.

The evening of September 6 was the opening reception for Professor Brittany Søndberg’s new exhibit titled “Negative Measure.” Professor Søndberg spoke with The Collegian about her work and the interpretations she would hope viewers might take away.

“The work on display was created at different times for a variety of group and/or public exhibitions, though five of the works were created just for Negative Measure,” Søndberg said about the purpose of creating these sculpures. “As a visual artist, images and ideas form in my head regularly, but often and especially in the creation of larger works, an opportunity to exhibit them is what actually gets me to produce.”

She said that, while creating, she didn’t intend for viewers to feel or gather anything too specific.

“I am more interested in the viewer gleaning their own understanding from the abstract forms,” Søndberg said. “Everyone perceives visual art, or really the world in general for that matter, through a lens which is informed by their own personal experience. So the forms I imagine and create may or may not trigger certain thoughts or images in their mind’s eye and it is this unique difference of interpretation I’m interested in stimulating.”

“This collection of sculpture is rooted in a similar interest,” Søndberg said of the exhibit. “These works attempt to trace or externalize internal processes; feelings and impressions of things which don’t exist in physical form, such as the bonds we experience in personal relationships, our impression of sensation, memory, etc. There is no way (and there will likely never be a way) to compare or genuinely share these internal experiences with others. In a way, I consider material form to be like a memory which recreates itself each time it is called to experience, so I am making with my hands a visual and physical manifestation of the idea of memory and perception.”

Professor Søndberg teaches a variety of 3D classes, all of which are open to non-majors, though some have prerequisites. Some courses she teaches include: Women’s Art History, 3D Foundations, Ceramics I-III, Sculpture, Contemporary Practices and Contemporary Crafts (which will be offered for the first time in Spring 2018, and will include metal-smithing, jewelry design, spoon carving and functional ceramics).

If you are looking to take an art class for fun or for your major, please contact Professor Søndberg with any questions you may have. And definitely check out her new show in the Irene Cullis and Anne Rudd Galyon Galleries in Cowan.