“Eastern Standard” takes the stage

“Eastern Standard” was in Huggins Performance Center in Odell Building March 24-27 at 7:30 p.m. This ensemble show featured six acting majors, assistant-directed by musical theatre major Adora Txakeeyang, and directed by professor Wm. Perry Morgan.


“I chose this because it is a strong ensemble piece, and right now that is what the department needs,” said Morgan. “That is where you can all grow and form the show together because everybody is integral in telling the story. The ensemble is on stage, and they are all working together and creating the space and the environment of the story together.”

“Eastern Standard is about people from all walks of life and all of the moments that they share together,” said sophomore acting major Cheyenne Doom. Freshman acting major Karin Powell mentioned that “this show explores how life can go from simple and mundane to wonderful and perfect to disappointing and frustrating in a very short period of time. [This play] brings the true standard of what life really is.”

“The script is fabulous,” said junior musical theatre major Adora Txakeeyang. “The characters and the relationships and the words are so well-written. It is real and raw and beautiful.” This show is Txakeeyang’s first collegiate experience assistant directing, and she said that “the environment is so fun and creative, and [she is] learning so much and is glad to be able to have this opportunity.”

“Adora is another eye, and she comes up with the greatest stuff and is always giving me ideas,” said professor Morgan. When referencing the script, Morgan mentioned that “the dialogue is so rich; it is such a well-written, well-crafted play that every scene gives you so many moments to play with and to add, so they all become my favorite.”

“What is special about this show is the comedy,” said junior acting major Saiir Foy-Coles. “It has a bunch of dark comedy and funny relationships between characters.” Sophomore acting major Zachary Orellana-Kennedy also said that “what is really special about this show is the comedy that we find in it.”

“Eastern Standard is special because it embodies the emotions of people from all walks of life,” said Cheyenne Doom. “It has both comedic and dramatic themes and highlights the characters’ emotions in such a natural way. I think this show is beautiful, thoughtful and truly real.”

“It is an escape,” said Morgan. “There are a lot of twists, and you fall in love with the characters. They each go on their own separate journey that you do not expect them to. There are a lot of twists that are entertaining and catch you off-guard. This is not a far-fetched story. You sit and you watch people in a restaurant, and you think that is the only way your life is interacting, intersecting with that person because you both happen to be in that restaurant at the same time.”

Then this play takes you to act two where now your lives really have intersected in a different way that we did not think,” continued Morgan. “This show will make you think about the way you look at people because you do not know somebody else’s life. You think you do and you really do not know. And then there is an opportunity for you to become a part of that person’s life in an unexpected way. That is what the play is all about.”

By Josie Gold